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Breakfast train

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Breakfast train

I love transforming simple breakfasts into magical experiences. When you have a bit more time at the weekend it can mean starting the day with happy, smiling faces!!

My boys shared this fun train and loved picking which parts were destined for their respective bowls (I made it on a plastic tray I picked up in a discount store).

If the portion size is too big then you can always freeze it until the next day. The banana goes all sweet and gooey and to defrost just pour on warm milk and watch the rest of the train vanish.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 wheat bricks
  • 2 bananas (or you can swap for pear or apple and use a cookie cutter to make circles for the wheels)
  • I used sultanas, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds (pepitas) to fill the trucks (use whatever you would like to jazz up the cereal – chopped dried fruit, pieces of apple, some of the banana…)
  • I used oats as carriage connectors (sunflower seeds or sultanas would also work)
  • almond for the cow catcher
  • I used yoghurt for the steam (coconut cream is a good non-dairy substitute)

Method

Step 1 Cut the top corner off a wheat brick to make the curved front of the engine. It won’t crumble if you use a sharp knife and cut boldly!

Step 2 Add another wheat brick for the engine cab.

Step 3 Cut a wheat brick in half to make the two trucks.

Step 4 Then add banana wheels.

Step 5 And a banana funnel and window.

Step 6 I used oats to make the connectors between the carriages.

Step 7 Before filling them with sultanas, sunflower seeds and pepitas.

Step 8 And what train would be complete without yoghurt steam?

A fun breakfast to choo chew!!

Judith

Judith Yeabsley is a mum of two boys who is
passionate about healthy food for kids. Her blog
The Art of Nutrition is a popular place to find
inspiration for fun, healthy, creative food for kids
big and small. Judith describes her mission as
“how to present healthy food creatively so it is
delicious looking and impulse-creating, so kids
can’t wait to tackle the plate”. The focus is fruit, vegetables and whole
grains. The plates are designed to be made by the average time-poor
parent, in the average kitchen, using readily available ingredients and
working on a budget.




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